Bug Gwen's Annex

RSS
smithsonianlibraries:

Wilhelm C. H. (Wilhelm C. Hartwig) PetersNaturwissenschaftliche reise nach Mossambique, auf befehl Seiner Majestät des königs Friedrich Wilhelm IV, in den jahren 1842 bis 1848 ausgefḧrt, von Wihelm C. H. Peters. Zoologie , 1852-
In the collection Butterflies and Moths in our Galaxy of Images.

<3

smithsonianlibraries:

Wilhelm C. H. (Wilhelm C. Hartwig) Peters
Naturwissenschaftliche reise nach Mossambique, auf befehl Seiner Majestät des königs Friedrich Wilhelm IV, in den jahren 1842 bis 1848 ausgefḧrt, von Wihelm C. H. Peters. Zoologie , 1852-

In the collection Butterflies and Moths in our Galaxy of Images.

<3

atelierentomologica:

Parure (jewellery set) consisting of tiara, earrings and necklace mounted with beetle wings, 1884-85, by Phillips of Cockspur Street made for Countess Granville. The beetles had been given to Earl Granville as a gift by the Portuguese ambassador of the day.

Shiny!

atelierentomologica:

Parure (jewellery set) consisting of tiara, earrings and necklace mounted with beetle wings, 1884-85, by Phillips of Cockspur Street made for Countess Granville. The beetles had been given to Earl Granville as a gift by the Portuguese ambassador of the day.

Shiny!

libutron:

The colorful grasshopper that remained incognito for over 100 years
Petasida ephippigera (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae) is an endemic Australian species with striking appearance. Commonly named  Leichhardt’s Grasshopper, after explorer Ludwig Leichhardt, this grasshopper is brilliant orange-red, navy blue, and black over the whole body and wings.
Besides being one of the most spectacularly colorful of the Australian grasshoppers, it is truly remarkable because until the 60’s the genus Petasida was known from only five specimens of the single described species, three in the British Museum (Natural History) and two in the Geneva Museum.
Petasida ephippigera remained without being collected for about 120 years, and was rediscovered on 30 July 1971, when it was found a single male nymph. This discovery was soon followed by a number of others.
Unlike some other grasshopper species that have varied diets, the Leichhardt’s grasshopper prefers a plant called Pityrodia (Lamiaceae), and nothing else (specimen shown is on a Pityrodia plant). This species occurs in the rugged country of Kakadu, in the Northern Territory of Australia, wherein said plant is distributed.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jon Clark | Locality: Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia (2009)

Neat colors and story!

libutron:

The colorful grasshopper that remained incognito for over 100 years

Petasida ephippigera (Orthoptera - Pyrgomorphidae) is an endemic Australian species with striking appearance. Commonly named  Leichhardt’s Grasshopper, after explorer Ludwig Leichhardt, this grasshopper is brilliant orange-red, navy blue, and black over the whole body and wings.

Besides being one of the most spectacularly colorful of the Australian grasshoppers, it is truly remarkable because until the 60’s the genus Petasida was known from only five specimens of the single described species, three in the British Museum (Natural History) and two in the Geneva Museum.

Petasida ephippigera remained without being collected for about 120 years, and was rediscovered on 30 July 1971, when it was found a single male nymph. This discovery was soon followed by a number of others.

Unlike some other grasshopper species that have varied diets, the Leichhardt’s grasshopper prefers a plant called Pityrodia (Lamiaceae), and nothing else (specimen shown is on a Pityrodia plant). This species occurs in the rugged country of Kakadu, in the Northern Territory of Australia, wherein said plant is distributed.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jon Clark | Locality: Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia (2009)

Neat colors and story!

canvaspaintings:

Pink Flowering Gum // SALE 3 for 2 // flowers and bees, popular nature art print, size 8x10 (No. 24) by TevaKiwi (18.00 USD) http://ift.tt/1bBEIzZ

canvaspaintings:

Pink Flowering Gum // SALE 3 for 2 // flowers and bees, popular nature art print, size 8x10 (No. 24) by TevaKiwi (18.00 USD) http://ift.tt/1bBEIzZ

There is an entire post of insects from medieval manuscripts from the British Museum! Go check it out!

There is an entire post of insects from medieval manuscripts from the British Museum! Go check it out!

BEES! Now in Shiny, Shiny Blue.

Latest at Charismatic Minifauna

steampunktendencies:

GEORGE Leontiev BALABANOV House of Humor and Satire. Gabrovo. Bulgaria. Winner of Grand Prize “GOLDEN AESOP” 2011 (Sculptures)

What the&#8230;..But cool.

steampunktendencies:

GEORGE Leontiev BALABANOV 
House of Humor and Satire. Gabrovo. Bulgaria. 
Winner of Grand Prize “GOLDEN AESOP” 2011 
(Sculptures)

What the…..

But cool.

libutron:

Nomia iridescens a Bee with colourful abdominal stripes 

This cool bee, scientifically named Nomia iridescens, belongs to the Halictidae Family, a cosmopolitan group commonly referred to as halictid bees and sweat bees.

Nomia iridescens is a conspicuously banded bee with amazing neon-green stripes, which occurs in southeast Asia (India, Borneo, Peninsular malaysia, Philippines).

Sweat bees, play a vital role in the pollination ecology of a region. By having  a wide range of adaptational capabilities, these inhabit all kind of ecological niches both in tropical and temperate regions. In number and kind these anthophilic insects (attracted to flowers) surpass all other bees and thus are mainly responsible for conserving the vegetation germplasm by pollinating a bewildering variety of wild and cultivated entomophilic flora.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Paul Bertner | Locality: Mt. Isarog National Park, Philippines (2014) | [Top] - [Middle] - [Bottom]

Cool!

northeastnature:

These gorgeous little damselflies are called sphagnum sprites (Nehalennia gracilis), and I found them earlier in the summer in a colorful sphagnum bog. The two damselflies at right are in an awkward pre-mating pose, with the male (at left) grasping the female’s midsection (thorax) with the tip of his tail (abdomen). The third damselfly is having none of this.

Squeee!

northeastnature:

These gorgeous little damselflies are called sphagnum sprites (Nehalennia gracilis), and I found them earlier in the summer in a colorful sphagnum bog. The two damselflies at right are in an awkward pre-mating pose, with the male (at left) grasping the female’s midsection (thorax) with the tip of his tail (abdomen). The third damselfly is having none of this.

Squeee!

esabelleryngin:

My coloring book, The Beginner Entomologist, is all printed and completely finished!! It’s chock-full of cool facts and activities about insects! Look forward to picking up a copy at SPX this Fall, after which I’ll be releasing a PDF copy for purchase as well!

This looks very interesting!!